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Hybrid-Electric STOL and USTOL Aircraft

Micor Technology | USTOL
Hybrid-Electric STOL and USTOL Aircraft
The Distributed Electric Propulsion (DEP) system, an emerging type of hybrid-electric propulsion system for aircrafts similar to rapidly expanding cars’ hybrid-electric propulsion, is stimulating novel aircraft designs. A basic DEP system is comprised of one or more range extenders which together with an advanced energy storage system such as a battery pack or a fuel cell stack is providing the propulsion system’s main energy source. Several high-power density electrical motors activate the propellers, ducted-fans or any other thrust producing components.

When combined with innovative thrust augmenting technologies the DEP system facilitates the creation of new class of aircrafts such as the Short Take-Off and Landing (STOL) and the Ultra-Short Take-Off and Landing (USTOL). These types of aircrafts can be made by modifying the existing aircraft bodies or can be all together new designs.

One of Micor Technologies’ main activity focus is the development of novel DEP propulsion systems based on a unique Wankel multi-fuel engine or other advanced Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) technology in conjunction with innovative, proprietary, thrust augmenting frame modifications of the USTOL and STOL aircrafts.

Other known thrust enhancing technologies which can be used in the Micor’s aircraft design concepts are:

  • Extreme Morphing Wing (EMW) – a wing with a flexible flap than can bend the air flow at a high angle  without producing flow separation.
  • Propeller with direct deflection – a propeller creating a slipstream underneath the wing so that the slipstream is deflected by the flap.
  • Blown wing – a wing positioned  such that the propeller air streams amplifies the pressure on the lower surface and reduces the pressure on the upper surface augmenting the lift.

General aviation configuration STOL with pusher propellers and EMW

Micor Technologies | USTOL Front Fixed Wings

A first variant, a STOL aircraft for 8-10 passengers, uses four propellers located on the front fixed wings. The transition of the aircraft’s propulsion system position from take-off to forward flight is easy to achieve.

Micor Technologies | USTOL Front & Rear Fixed Wings

In a second variant an USTOL type aircraft for 8-10 passengers has four propellers located on the front fixed wings and two propellers located on the rear fixed wings. The transition of the USTOL aircraft propulsion positioning from take-off to forward flight is seamless.

Both the STOL and USTOL variants could use a DEP system with a Wankel engine range extender which is located in the front compartment of the aircraft. The DEP’s battery pack provides a back-up source of power for take-off/landing and forward flying phase.


Recreational aircrafts with EMW and tractor propellers

Micor | USTOL Light with 4 Propellers

This USTOL light aircraft can carry 2-4 passengers. A first variant use four tractor propellers with direct deflection and Coanda effect and a fifth tractor propeller with direct deflection as is shown here.

Micor | USTOL Light with 4 Propellers

A second variant uses two tractor propellers with direct deflection. A third propeller, located on the tail, is used to balance the aircraft in all flying phases.


Recreational aircrafts with EMW and tractor propellers

This aircraft uses four tractor propellers with direct deflection and Coanda effect. A rotor located on the tail is used to balance the aircraft and to change direction.

These STOL and USTOL design configurations using EMW have significant advantages when compared with the state-of-the-art solutions:

  • Ultra-short runways needed for take-off and landing.
  • High redundancy level offered by employing several propelling units
  • Improved efficiency due to the use of the hybrid propulsion system and thrust augmenters
  • Simplicity of the construction which affords reduced vehicle manufacturing and maintenance costs due to use of existing fuselage.


General aviation configuration with ducted fans and thrust augmenters

Micor | Tilting Rotor VTOL/USTOL Aircraft

A tilting rotor VTOL or USTOL aircraft uses a propulsion system comprised of a hybrid-electric range extender as powerplant located into the tail of the aircraft and clusters of multiple ducted fans with advanced design trust augmenters mounted on the wings used as propelling enhancing elements.

Micor | Tilting Rotor VTOL/USTOL Aircraft

The configuration shown here uses two propelling units, each having a number of ducted fans with a common thrust augmenter. This type of propelling units offers the following advantages compared with simple ducted fans:

  • The thrust augmenter increases the volume of air propelled with a corresponding decrease in average air velocity.
  • The bypassed air is moving at a much faster rate of speed than the ambient air but with a lower rate of speed than the inner flow. This reduces the speed difference between the inner air flow and the air surrounding it, further improving efficiency and reducing noise.
  • The air jet’s contact surface with the ground is increased when compared to simple ducted fan, reducing the required power and the erosion of the ground surface during take-off and landing.
  • The recirculation air flow is diminished in take-off position.
  • Adding a second duct is increasing the efficiency of the propelling system by acting as an aerofoil.


Configuration with ducted fans, thrust augmenters and blown wings

Micor | Tilting Rotor VTOL Aircraft

A tilting rotor VTOL aircraft shown here uses a hybrid powerplant solution based on one or more Wankel engine range extenders located into the tail of the aircraft.

The propelling units positioning in vertical lift phase and in forward flight phase are shown here.

Micor | Tilting Rotor VTOL Aircraft

This configuration uses four ducted fan packs for propulsion each having a number of ducted fans with a common thrust augmenter. The front propeller packs are located below the level of the wings and the rear propeller packs are located above the wing level.

This configuration with blown wings offers the following advantages:

  • An increased circulation of the air around the wings from transition to forward flight ensuring a high efficiency.
  • The wing configuration offers high lift with reduced dimensions.
  • The energy consumption is reduced in all the operation conditions.
  • It is a scalable concept.
  • Multi-redundant powerplant and propeller systems.